Girolamo frescobaldi - gustav leonhardt - clavecin


While Frescobaldi's style of playing was hailed as brilliantly original and definitively progressive to the point that subsequent performers could not dream of doing other than adopting it, and his counterpoint is frequently so novel as to be disturbing to conservatives, his use of form and harmony was far too old-fashioned for the modernists. He pioneered no new forms, nor indeed used any that were not more than fifty years old. His keyboard works do not exhibit clear separation between melody and harmony in the bass, nor do they adopt the phrasing of the emerging monody. In these ways Frescobaldi was clearly old-fashioned, yet his compositions are so strikingly original in conception that virtually nothing of the era sounds like them. He was also an obsessive "corrector" of his own work, to the point where many of his major compositions were modified several times, and some added or dropped entirely in different editions of the same publication. One can hardly judge these corrections unsuccessful, however, as they frequently add to the sense of continuity in the various sections. Frescobaldi's prowess at the keyboard was balanced by an apparent lack of education, to the point that it was seriously suggested that he did not understand the words he set to music and indeed that his own unedited writing was virtually unintelligible. His relatively modest published vocal music is of no historical interest aside from helping to illuminate his music as a whole.

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Born in 1583, Girolamo Frescobaldi would grow up to be one of the most famous representatives of the early Italian Baroque. He was known for expressive and extravagant improvising and composition. In 1608, he took the organist post of St. Peter's in Rome. Although he held this highly-regarded job that won him many patrons, the pay was never more than a small fraction of his income. He obsessively edited his own work, to the point where many of his major… read more


Girolamo Frescobaldi - Gustav Leonhardt - ClavecinGirolamo Frescobaldi - Gustav Leonhardt - ClavecinGirolamo Frescobaldi - Gustav Leonhardt - ClavecinGirolamo Frescobaldi - Gustav Leonhardt - Clavecin

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